New Poem – Fleeting Stillness

I apologize for the delay in posting this news. It is an honour to announce that my poem Fleeting Stillness was selected as one of the judge’s choices in the Drummond Poetry Contest. This contest is held annually by the Spring Pulse Poetry Festival and it collects poems from all across Canada. To find out more information about this organization, please visit their website here: https://www.springpulsepoetryfestival.com/

Dr. William Henry Drummond was a poet who specialized in writing dialect verse poems. His work gained international renown around the start of the 20th century and he is considered to be one of Canada’s first national poets. He was a pillar of his community, running silver mines and serving as doctor. That is why in 1970, the town of Cobalt, founded the Drummond Poetry contest to honour his legacy.

My poem, Fleeting Stillness, explores the everyday moments of beauty that we often miss. It looks at how both the natural world and human world are able to transform each other and the importance of this balancing act. This is one of my favourite poems, partly because it was one of those pieces that took a long time to construct and i spent a long time playing with it until it felt right.

Thank you again to the Spring Pulse Poetry Festival and David Brydges for putting together this anthology. Also a big thank you to the Keith Inman, for taking time to review all of the submissions. It is truly an honour to share ink with such talented Canadian poets.

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Cover Design: Carol Cormier

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New Poem – A Wind Chime’s Purpose

PQ2018

Thank you again Prolific Press for including my poem in the 2018 Spring issue of Poetry Quarterly. This is the winners issue and features an excellent collection of poets including the Rebecca Lard Award Winner:  Suzanne Cottrell. This issue can be purchased from the Prolific Press bookstore.

 

 

 

Crows Gather in Mass

Tan 6

Thank you Tanka Journal for including my poem in your collection. It has been fun to discover a new style of poetry. The tanka style originates in Japan and it was often used as a short form way to send a message that expresses romance, desire or gratitude. If you want to learn more about this style click here. Check out my latest poem for free in Issue 6

If you are looking for a set of poems to add to your library, this volume can be purchased from the Prolific Press bookstore here: Issue 6

I am including a brief exploration of this poem, to provide a little more insight into my creative process. Please read the poem before you continue with this post. I feel that it is important to experience art.

Crows Gather in Mass

Tanka poems usually have two sections to them and this poem is no exception. The first part of the poem has crows gathering before the dawn. They represent the edge of darkness that lingers before the sun rises. The second part of the poem shows the crows becoming guides as the shadowy figures retreat, bowing to the new day. This poem attempts to create powerful and explosive imagery as two forces exchange control of the sky.

Thank you again to Prolific Press for all your continued support and thank you to those who inspire me to keep on writing.

-Zach Agnew

Horizon Lines Shift

TL46

A big thank you to Three Line Poetry for including my poem in your publication. This journal always has amazing work from poets all around the world.  Keep up the great work! Check out my latest poem for free in Issue 46

If you are looking for a set of poems to add to your library, this volume can be purchased from the Prolific Press bookstore here: Issue 46

I am including a brief exploration of this tiny poem, to provide a little more insight into my creative process. Please read the poem before you continue with this post. I feel that it is important to experience art.

Horizon Lines Shift

The horizon has often been a focal point in both my writing and my photography, which is funny as the horizon is pointless. Yet there is just something awe inspiring about the way it wraps around our world. The first line of this poem represents a change as a shifting horizon usually means a change in perspective. Yet the next line shows that this change is not a good one as the subject of the poem appears to be in distress. The final line is used to demonstrate two things. First, it shows the finality of death, like the horizon which is unending. Secondly, it uses the word embrace to show that the subject has accepted their fate.

Thank you again to Prolific Press for all your continued support and thank you to those who inspire me to keep on writing.

-Zach Agnew